Japan decides to dump 1.2 million tonnes of radioactive water into the sea

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Almost a decade after the nuclear disaster of Fukushima, the government of Japan has decided to release more than a million tonnes of contaminated water into the sea, news reports reported on Friday, and a formal announcement should be made by the end of this month.

The decision is expected to irritate neighboring countries like South Korea, which has already stepped up Japan’s food radiation tests, and further devastate the fishing industry in Fukushima, which has been fighting this measure for years.

The disposal of contaminated water from the Fukushima Daiichi plant is a problem that has dragged on as the country continues its decades-long decommissioning process. Currently, almost 1.2 million tons of contaminated water are stored in giant tanks at the facility.

The plant managed by Tokyo Electric Power Company suffered several nuclear melts after the earthquake followed by the 2011 tsunami.

Also on Friday, Japanese Industry Minister Hiroshi Kajiyama said that a decision on the release of water has not yet been made, but that the government plans to take one quickly.

“To avoid any delays in the decommissioning process, we need to make a decision quickly,” he said at a news conference.

He gave no further details, including a timetable.

Source: Exame

Almost a decade after the nuclear disaster of Fukushima, the government of Japan has decided to release more than a million tonnes of contaminated water into the sea, news reports reported on Friday, and a formal announcement should be made by the end of this month.

The decision is expected to irritate neighboring countries like South Korea, which has already stepped up Japan’s food radiation tests, and further devastate the fishing industry in Fukushima, which has been fighting this measure for years.

The disposal of contaminated water from the Fukushima Daiichi plant is a problem that has dragged on as the country continues its decades-long decommissioning process. Currently, almost 1.2 million tons of contaminated water are stored in giant tanks at the facility.

The plant managed by Tokyo Electric Power Company suffered several nuclear melts after the earthquake followed by the 2011 tsunami.

Also on Friday, Japanese Industry Minister Hiroshi Kajiyama said that a decision on the release of water has not yet been made, but that the government plans to take one quickly.

“To avoid any delays in the decommissioning process, we need to make a decision quickly,” he said at a news conference.

He gave no further details, including a timetable.

Source: Exame

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