Poll completed: Luis Arce is the new president of Bolivia

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THE Bolivia concluded, on Friday, the 23rd, the slow vote counting of last Sunday’s election, in which the leftist Luis Arce he surprisingly won in the first round, with twice the votes of his main opponent, Carlos Mesa.

After the official counting of 100% of the votes, ex-president Evo Morales’ supporter obtained 55.10% of the valid votes, compared to 28.83% of the centrist Mesa. In third place, right-wing Luis Fernando Camacho was 14.0%.

The final result coincides, with minor variations, with the projections made on Sunday night by the television channel Unitel and the Catholic foundation Jubileo, 7 hours after the closing of the vote, which allowed to end the uncertainty due to the lack of official preliminary results.

Both polls predicted Arce’s 22 point advantage over Mesa, but the end result was much higher: 26.27 points.

The Supreme Electoral Court (TSE) will present the results this Friday, at 6 pm local time (7 pm in Brasília), and will proclaim Arce’s victory. This marks the return to power of the Movement to Socialism (MAS), 11 months after the fall of Morales amid protests and allegations of electoral fraud.

TSE President Salvador Romero said that Arce and the new Congress – renewed in its entirety on Sunday – will assume their functions “during the first half of November”, but did not provide an exact date.

Arce, 57, was the architect of the “economic miracle” of the Morales government (2006-2019) as finance minister.

He won massive support from Bolivians, thanks to Morales’ political capital and hopes of a return to lost prosperity, amid a country collapsed by the coronavirus and the economic crisis.

The TSE took five days to count the votes, something that in other Latin American countries takes a few hours. This time, a manual process was used, after the last minute cancellation of the digital rapid counting system for the sake of data reliability.

Shaken by the surprising decision of the polls not anticipated by any research, sectors of the right took to the streets to protest, denouncing an alleged “fraud”.

International election observation missions said, however, that the process was clean and gave “legitimacy” to the new left-wing government, which will replace that of interim right-wing president, Jeanine Áñez.

On Sunday, 6,483,893 of the qualified citizens went to the polls, a record 88.42% of the 7.3 million registered, according to the TSE’s final data.

EU congratulates Arce

The European Union on Friday congratulated Arce’s victory at the polls and expressed his desire to start working soon with the new elected officials.

A note signed by the EU’s high commissioner for foreign affairs, Spaniard Joseph Borrell, also praised massive electoral participation, despite restrictions by the coronavirus pandemic.

According to Borrell, the EU “remains on Bolivia’s side and hopes to be able to work with the new authorities to consolidate prosperity and stability in the country, in a spirit of reconciliation, unity and inclusion”.

Source: Exame

THE Bolivia concluded, on Friday, the 23rd, the slow vote counting of last Sunday’s election, in which the leftist Luis Arce he surprisingly won in the first round, with twice the votes of his main opponent, Carlos Mesa.

After the official counting of 100% of the votes, ex-president Evo Morales’ supporter obtained 55.10% of the valid votes, compared to 28.83% of the centrist Mesa. In third place, right-wing Luis Fernando Camacho was 14.0%.

The final result coincides, with minor variations, with the projections made on Sunday night by the television channel Unitel and the Catholic foundation Jubileo, 7 hours after the closing of the vote, which allowed to end the uncertainty due to the lack of official preliminary results.

Both polls predicted Arce’s 22 point advantage over Mesa, but the end result was much higher: 26.27 points.

The Supreme Electoral Court (TSE) will present the results this Friday, at 6 pm local time (7 pm in Brasília), and will proclaim Arce’s victory. This marks the return to power of the Movement to Socialism (MAS), 11 months after the fall of Morales amid protests and allegations of electoral fraud.

TSE President Salvador Romero said that Arce and the new Congress – renewed in its entirety on Sunday – will assume their functions “during the first half of November”, but did not provide an exact date.

Arce, 57, was the architect of the “economic miracle” of the Morales government (2006-2019) as finance minister.

He won massive support from Bolivians, thanks to Morales’ political capital and hopes of a return to lost prosperity, amid a country collapsed by the coronavirus and the economic crisis.

The TSE took five days to count the votes, something that in other Latin American countries takes a few hours. This time, a manual process was used, after the last minute cancellation of the digital rapid counting system for the sake of data reliability.

Shaken by the surprising decision of the polls not anticipated by any research, sectors of the right took to the streets to protest, denouncing an alleged “fraud”.

International election observation missions said, however, that the process was clean and gave “legitimacy” to the new left-wing government, which will replace that of interim right-wing president, Jeanine Áñez.

On Sunday, 6,483,893 of the qualified citizens went to the polls, a record 88.42% of the 7.3 million registered, according to the TSE’s final data.

EU congratulates Arce

The European Union on Friday congratulated Arce’s victory at the polls and expressed his desire to start working soon with the new elected officials.

A note signed by the EU’s high commissioner for foreign affairs, Spaniard Joseph Borrell, also praised massive electoral participation, despite restrictions by the coronavirus pandemic.

According to Borrell, the EU “remains on Bolivia’s side and hopes to be able to work with the new authorities to consolidate prosperity and stability in the country, in a spirit of reconciliation, unity and inclusion”.

Source: Exame

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